Paul Mampilly’s Advice to Stock Investors

Paul Mampilly worked on the Kinetic Assets Management small Hedge Fund valued at $6 billion but helped it grow up to $26 billion marks. The move was unique, and Paul received invitations to share Paul Mampilly’s success story through Bloomberg, CNBC, and Fox Business among other media outlets. A private research company realized an increase in stock by 1,598% in three years. Paul Mampilly had made a stock portfolio for the private research company. Before working here, he worked in Bankers Trust as an assistant portfolio Manager, ING, and Deutsche Bank and gained experience in investing because he occupied senior positions. The exposure attracted other companies who recognized his work and were willing to employ him. Paul didn’t stay long in employment and decided to leave and stay with his family.

Currently, Mampilly offers investment analysis and research services to the investors and his ambition is to make them generate income. He also gives them tips on how to make more money in their investments. Apart from the interviews from the media, Paul gives free advice from his Profits Unlimited newsletter, which has more than 90,000 subscribers. The eight-page monthly newsletter started circulation from 2016 through Banyan Hill Publishing. In the newsletter, Paul gives a hint on the best stocks readers can buy and make some profit. Every week, Paul Mampilly writes a column for the Winning Investor Daily and simultaneously manages True Momentum and Extreme Fortunes trading services.

According to Paul Mampilly, one mistake that investors make is to put all their money in one stock and make a bet on it. He insists that this is a grievous mistake because if something goes wrong with the stock, the investor loses all the money at a go. Another error in stock trading is investing too much in one stock. The best idea is to distribute the funds in different shares to be on the safe side. The third mistake is to buy the stocks without first analyzing the market. Most investors buy the stock when they feel they have the money instead of waiting when the price is meager. Paul Mampilly cites those as the biggest mistakes the investors should avoid if they would like to realize a good return from their stocks.